3 Types of Bijlia Succulent Pictorial Guide

The genus Bijlia succulent belongs to the Aizoaceae family, which is part of the larger group Angiosperms (flowering plants).The genus Bijlia is limited to the Little Karoo in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. 3 Types of Bijlia Succulent Pictorial Guide.
3 Types of Bijlia Succulent Pictorial Guide Pin

The genus Bijlia succulent belongs to the Aizoaceae family, which is part of the larger group Angiosperms (flowering plants).The genus Bijlia is limited to the Little Karoo in the Western Cape Province, South Africa.

The fleshy, uneven leaves, with each pair bearing the imprint of the other, are characteristic of the Bijlia genus. Big, flashy yellow flowers appear in the fall. The plants need appropriate water and brilliant light if they are to stay compact. They are propagated by seed.

In this 3 Species of Bijlia Succulent Pictorial Guide, we will cover the following 3 Types.

1. Bijlia Tugwelliae (Prince Albert Vygie)

Bijlia Tugwelliae‘s common names are Prince Albert Vygie and Iceplant. It is a perfectly clumping perennial that forms succulent mats. It is closely related to Hereroa in the family Aizoaceae.

Bijlia Tugwelliae (Prince Albert Vygie) Pin

origins in the northern mountains of the Little Karoo desert, Prince Albert, Western Cape, South Africa. It is one of the more appealing iceplants from South Africa, notable for its big leaves and the show of lasting, intense yellow flowers in the winter season.

Habitat and ecology: Bijlia Tugwelliae grows in gravelly flat areas

Stones: Broken quartzite, quarzitic sandstone, cliff and dolerite.

Bijlia Tugwelliae (Prince Albert Vygie) Pin

Leaves: It is 6-9 cm long, about 10 mm wide, about 24 mm in size, fleshy, smooth, fairly stiff, tough to the touch, upright, finger-like tubular-falcate to laterally compressed, keeled, almost crescent-shaped, sometimes paddle-shaped, pale whitish, yellowish-green, blue-green to pinkish, waxen with a thick layer of crystals in the external epidermis wall. Every year, a couple of brand-new leaves grow from the central stem.

Flowers: Long-term, pale tan, white to brilliant yellow up to 5 cm broad, petal about 20-22 mm long in two series, with green glands. stamens in an erected package.

Blooming season: Flowers generally bloom in late winter, however, sometimes in autumn too.

Fruit: A big ovate is deeply seated in between the leaves, opening entirely 5-locular.

Bijlia Tugwelliae (Prince Albert Vygie) Pin

Cultivation: Bijlia tugwelliae is easy to grow. These ; theyplants grow fromin theain in winter eason, and require little water during summer do;mancy, otherwise, their epidermis breaks (resulting in undesirable scars). Water is only required in the summer when the plant begins to shrivel; however, if water is provided, it will normally grow even in the summer. It requires a good drain. Keep them cool and shaded in the summer, require full sun or light shade and are hardy to -2 °C.

Propagation: Seeds, cuttings.

2. Bijlia Dilatata

Bijlia Dilatata, common name: Prince Albert Vygie Also understood in cultivation under the misapplied name “Bijlia Cana,” this practically stemless, seasonal, mat-forming succulent can reach as much as 12 cm and more in diameter, with closely growing rosettes of impressive, club-like, unevenly shaped leaves. The keeled end is drawn forward over the idea to form a “chin.” Flowers are bright yellow and born on short stalks in the winter season.

Bijlia Dilatata Pin

Origin and environment: Bijlia Dilatata is endemic to a few sites just north of Prince Albert (South Africa), in the southern area of the Great Karoo desert. Six populations of the species are separated by 2–30 km.

Habitat: This species grows on silcrete spots; the daisy-like yellow flowers appear to grow out of solid rock, making one marvel at how their roots discover sources of nourishment. Similar succulents that grow in such habitat conditions are the Great Karoo stone plant (Lithops localis), the volstruiskos (Glottiphyllum neilii), the tufted liver plant (Pleiospilos compactus), and the sandpaper ruschia (Ruschia muricata).

Stems: The plants produce 2-3 short branches in small to large clusters, internodes not visible.

Rosettes: Prostrate, with 2-6 unequal leaf-pairs.

Leaves: fleshy, pale grayish-green or yellowish tinged with red, especially in strong sunlight and when kept dry; 3–4 (5.5) cm long and 12–15 mm wide at the base. The leaves can stretch up to 25 mm before tapering, with rounded tips and a triangular to diamond-shaped surface. The lower side of the leaf is drawn forward like a fan, as seen in other groups of extreme succulents in this family, where the leaf is more shortened on its way to becoming round.

The keeled end is drawn forwards over the tip to form a “chin.” Every year, a couple of brand-new leaves grow from the main stem. The whitish coloring of the leaves is due to the crystal layer in the outer epidermal walls, and this layer cannot be rubbed off.

Bijlia Dilatata Pin

Flowers: Organized in groups of 1 to 3 from one central point; practically sessile or short-stalked (stalk 2–10 mm long); developing from bracts; daisy-like up to 25–30 (50–70) mm in diameter; long-lasting. Petals in two rows, obovate to obovate, golden yellow or orange-yellow. calyx with five sepals, about equal. And keeled. Many endurances are leaning inwards. Ovary inferior with parietal placentas It has unique nectary glands. Preconception 5: thread-like, longer than ovary cell depth. 

Fruits (capsules): 5 locular; valves small with high valve rims; covering membranes present with large connected closing bodies and no indication of valve wings. 

Seeds: Ovoid. Pointed.

Flowering season: It flowers late in the year and may continue flowering through the winter season.

Cultivation and Propagation: Bijlia Dilatata is easy to grow. These plants grow on winter rain and were headed for summer inactivity.

Exposure: It requires complete sun or light shade.

Bijlia Dilatata Pin

Watering: It requires little water or else its epidermis will break, resulting in unsightly scars. Bijlia dilatata ought to be watered in the fall as new growth appears. The many yellow flowers appear in the winter season. After flowering, decline watering to prepare it for a rather dry summer rest. Water plants sparingly in the summer; only when the plant begins to shrivel will it normally grow, even if water is provided. requires good drainage.

Hardiness: The growing period of this plant is from autumn to spring, when it requires a temperature level of 10–16 °C and a sensible amount of water. Keep cool and shaded in the summer. hardy to -2 °C.

Propagation: Seeds, cuttings.

Taxonomic notes: Bijlia is closely related to Bergeranthus and Hereroa and also to Ruschia.

3. Bijlia Cana (Mesembryanthemaceae)

Bijlia cana, common name: Prince Albert Vygie, is a perennial clumping, mat-forming succulent. It is a slow-growing tongue, similar to the leaved mesemb. It is notable for its midwinter program of long-lasting brilliant yellow flowers, organized in groups of 1 to 3.

Bijlia Cana (Mesembryanthemaceae) Pin

Origin: Bijlia Cana is endemic to a couple of sites simply north of Prince Albert (South Africa, southern location of the Great Karoo desert). The types comprising six populations are isolated by 2–30 km.

Habitat: This type grows on silcrete patches; daisy-like yellow flowers appear to grow out of solid rock, making one marvel at how their roots find sources of nourishment. Other succulent plants in the region consist of the Great Karoo stone plant (Lithops localis), volstruiskos (Glottiphyllum neilii), tufted liver plant (Pleiospilos compactus), and sandpaper ruschia (Ruschia muricata).

Bijlia Cana (Mesembryanthemaceae) Pin

Stems: The plants produce 2-3 short branches in small to large clusters, with internodes that are not noticeable.

Rosettes: Prostrate, with 2-6 unequal leaf-pairs.

Leaves: 3-4 (or 5) cm long and 12-15 mm wide at the base, broadening to 25 mm and then tapering, ideas rounded, surface triangular to diamond-shaped, fleshy, pale greyish-green, or yellow-colored tinged with red, especially in strong sunlight and when kept dry, really unevenly formed, semi-cylindrical or clavately triangular, keeled, and the surface area smooth, ideas rounded, surface triangular to.

The lower side of the leaf is drawn forward like a, as seen in other groups of extreme succulents in this family, where the leaf is further shortened en route to becoming spherical. The keeled end is drawn forwards over the tip to form a “chin.” Every year, a couple of new leaves grow from the central stem. The whitish coloring of the leaves is because of the crystal layer in the outer epidermal walls, and this layer cannot be rubbed off.

Bijlia Cana (Mesembryanthemaceae) Pin

Flowers: Organized in groups of 1 to 3, practically sessile or short-stalked (stalk 2-10 mm long), arising from daisy-like bracts up to 25-30 (50) mm in diameter, and long lasting. Petals in two rows, golden yellow or orange-yellow, linear to narrowly obovate. calyx with five sepals, about equivalent. And keeled. Endurances lean in different ways. Ovary inferior with parietal placentas It has distinct nectary glands. Preconception 5: thread-like, longer than ovary cell depth. 

Fruits (Capsules): Relentless, 5 locular, small valves with high valve rims, covering membranes present with massive connected closing bodies, and no indication of valve wings. 

Bijlia Cana (Mesembryanthemaceae) Pin

Seeds: Ovoid. Pointed.

Frost Tolerance: Hardy to 28°F (-2°C)

Heat Tolerance: Keep cool and in light shade in summer

Sun Exposure: Light shade to full sun

Blooming season: It flowers late in the year and might continue flowering through the winter.

Cultivation: Bijlia is easy to grow. These plants grow in winter and require little water during summer dormancy. requires little water; otherwise, its skin breaks (resulting in unsightly scars). Water plants sparingly in the summer; only when the plant begins to shrivel will they normally grow even if water is provided. A great drain is required. In the summer, keep cool and shaded; you need full sun or light shade. hardy to -2 °C.

Propagation: Seeds, cuttings.

Taxonomic notes: Bijlia is closely related to Bergeranthus and Hereroa and also to Ruschia.

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