33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide

Sedum: The Low-Maintenance, Drought-Tolerant Plant Perfect for Your Garden

33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide Pin

If you’re looking for a sturdy, low-maintenance plant to contribute to your garden, sedum (also known as stonecrop) might be the perfect option for you. This versatile succulent is known for its thick, fleshy leaves and lively flowers, making it a popular choice for gardens, green roofs, and even as a ground cover.

33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide Pin

Among the very best things about Sedum is its dry-spell tolerance. It can go for long periods without water, making it ideal for gardeners who don’t have the time or resources to water frequently.This makes it an ideal option for xeriscaping, or landscaping with water-saving strategies.

33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide Pin

Sedum prefers well-draining soil and full sun, but it can also tolerate partial shade when planted. If planting in a garden bed, dig a hole that is somewhat larger than the root ball of the plant and add a percentage of compost or raw material to the soil. If planting on a green roof, use a lightweight soil mix specifically designed for green roofs.

33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide Pin

Taking care of sedum is also fairly simple. It doesn’t require regular watering or fertilizing, and it’s typically pest- and disease-free. However, if it ends up being too high or leggy, it can be cut back to encourage bushier development. Furthermore, it’s an excellent concept to safeguard young plants or those in containers with a layer of mulch or other insulation product to secure them throughout the winter season.

33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide Pin

Another terrific feature of Sedum is that it’s simple to propagate. You can propagate it by department, stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, and seed germination. This means that you can easily increase your Sedum collection or share it with friends and family.

If you’re searching for a hardy, low-maintenance plant that can withstand dry spells and add charm to your garden, Sedum is a fantastic alternative to consider.

With its thick, fleshy leaves and vibrant flowers, Sedum is a drought-tolerant, low-maintenance, easy-to-grow, and easy-to-propagate plant. It’s best for xeriscaping, roofing gardens, and ground covers.

33 Types Of Popular Sedum Pictorial Guide Pin

In summary, Sedum is a flexible plant that is perfect for any gardener looking for a low-maintenance, drought-tolerant option. Whether you’re planting in a garden bed, on a green roof, or as a ground cover, sedum is a fantastic option that is simple to care for and can add charm to your garden. Because of its ease of propagation, it’s an excellent way to grow your collection and show loved ones. 

In this pictorial guide, we cover 33 Most Popular Sedum Species as follows:

Sedum Spectabile

Sedum Spectabile Pin

Sedum Spectabile, likewise known as “snazzy stonecrop” or “ice plant,” is a popular species of Sedum known for its big, flat clusters of pink or purple flowers that bloom in late summer or early fall. It has a dispersing habit, making it a terrific choice for ground cover or as a border plant. It is sturdy in USDA zones 3–9 and prefers complete sun to partial shade and well-draining soil.

Sedum spectabile is a low-maintenance plant that is tolerant of poor soil conditions and dry spells. Proliferation can be done through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or division. It’s a fantastic option for ground covers, borders, and rock gardens.

Sedum Spurium

Sedum Spurium Pin

Sedum Spurium, likewise known as “two-row stonecrop,” is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small leaves and small, star-shaped flowers. It’s native to Eastern Europe and Asia. It is durable in USDA zones 3–8, drought-tolerant, and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers. It can be propagated easily through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or division. It’s a great option for green roofs and other locations where a low-growing, spreading plant is wanted.

Sedum Acre

Sedum Acre Pin

Sedum Acre, also referred to as “goldmoss stonecrop” or “wallpepper,” is a low-growing, creeping succulent that forms a dense mat of small, needle-like leaves and little, yellow flowers. It belongs to Europe and Asia. It is sturdy in USDA zones 3–8 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers. It can be propagated quickly through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or division. It’s an excellent alternative for green roofs and other areas where a low-growing, spreading plant is wanted.

Sedum Album

Sedum Album Pin

Sedum Album, likewise referred to as “white stonecrop,” is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves and small, white flowers. It belongs to Europe and Asia. It is durable in USDA zones 3–8 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers. It can be propagated quickly through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or department. It’s an excellent alternative for green roofs and other areas where a low-growing, spreading plant is wanted.

Sedum Telephium

Sedum Telephium Pin

Sedum Telephium, also referred to as “orpine” or “livelong,” is a type of Sedum that is native to Europe and Asia. It is a sturdy, upright perennial that is known for its thick, fleshy leaves and large clusters of pink, red, or white flowers. It generally grows to about 2-3 feet tall and is durable in USDA zones 3–9.

It prefers complete sun to partial shade and well-draining soil. It can be propagated by stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or department. It’s a great option for borders, rock gardens, and as a cut flower.

Sedum Kamtschaticum

Sedum Kamtschaticum Pin

Sedum Kamtschaticum, likewise called “Orange Stonecrop” or “Orange Sedum,” is a type of Sedum native to North East Asia. It is a sturdy, low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of small, fleshy leaves that are usually orange or yellow-orange in color. In late summer, it blooms with small yellow flowers.It is hardy in USDA zones 3–8 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers. It can be propagated quickly through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or division. It’s a terrific choice for green roofs and other locations where a low-growing, spreading plant is wanted.

Sedum Reflexum

Sedum Reflexum Pin

Sedum Reflexum, also referred to as “stonecrop” or “blue stonecrop,” is a species of Sedum that is native to Europe and Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are normally blue-green in color. It blooms in late summer with small yellow flowers.It is hardy in USDA zones 3–9 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers. It can be propagated easily through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or department. It’s a terrific alternative for green roofing systems and other locations where a low-growing, spreading plant is wanted.

Sedum Rupestre

Sedum Rupestre Pin

Sedum Rupestre, also referred to as “blue spruce stonecrop” or “rock stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum that is native to Europe and Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of small, fleshy leaves that are usually blue-green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are typically yellow but can also be pink or red in late summer. It is hardy in USDA zones 3–9 and prefers well-draining soil and complete sun to partial shade.

Sedum Sexangulare

Sedum Sexangulare Pin

Sedum Sexangulare, likewise referred to as “six-angled stonecrop,” is a species of Sedum that is native to Europe. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are typically green in color.

It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in the late summer season. It is durable in USDA zones 3–8 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers.

Sedum Dasyphyllum

Sedum Dasyphyllum Pin

Sedum Dasyphyllum, also known as “cushion stonecrop,” is a species of Sedum that is native to Europe and Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are typically green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in the late summertime. It is sturdy in USDA zones 4–8 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. It can be grown as a ground cover, in rock gardens, or in containers.

Sedum Sieboldii

Sedum Sieboldii Pin

Sedum Sieboldii, also referred to as “October Daphne” or “October Stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum that is native to Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of little, fleshy leaves that are usually green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are pink or white in late summer to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 4–8 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Ellacombianum

Sedum Ellacombianum Pin

Sedum Ellacombianum, likewise called “Ellacomb’s Stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum that is native to the United States and Canada. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are typically green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 4–8 and prefers well-draining soil and complete sun to partial shade

Sedum Lineare

Sedum Lineare Pin

Sedum Lineare, also known as “needle stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum native to Asia, the United States, and Canada. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of small, needle-like leaves that are typically green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 3–9 and prefers well-draining soil and complete sun to partial shade.

Sedum Pachyphyllum

Sedum Pachyphyllum Pin

Sedum Pachyphyllum, likewise referred to as “thick-leaved stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum native to the United States and Canada. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are usually green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 4–8.

Sedum Lydium

Sedum Lydium Pin

Sedum Lydium, also known as “Lydian Stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum native to Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of little, fleshy leaves that are normally green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 4–9 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Morganianum

Sedum Morganianum Pin

Sedum Morganianum, likewise known as “burro’s tail” or “donkey’s tail,” is a type of Sedum belonging to Mexico. It is a trailing succulent that forms a long, thick stem with little, fleshy leaves that are generally blue-green in color. It produces little pink or white flowers in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 10–11 and prefers well-draining soil and brilliant, indirect light.

It can be grown in hanging baskets or trained to climb a trellis or wall. It can be propagated quickly through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or by removing the stem sectors and planting them.

Sedum Makinoi

Sedum Makinoi Pin

Sedum Makinoi, also called “Makino’s Stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum belonging to Japan. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are generally green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 4–9 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Ewersii

Sedum Ewersii Pin

Sedum Ewersii is a type of Sedum native to Mexico. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of little, fleshy leaves that are usually green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is durable in USDA zones 9–11 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Makinoi Ogon

Sedum Makinoi Ogon Pin

Sedum Makinoi Ogon is a cultivar of Sedum makinoi, likewise referred to as “Makino’s Stonecrop,” that is native to Japan. It is a low-growing succulent with a creeping habit that forms a dense mat of small, fleshy leaves that are generally golden yellow in color.

It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is durable in USDA zones 4–9 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Clavatum

Sedum Clavatum Pin

Sedum Clavatum, likewise referred to as “Club-shaped Stonecrop,” is a species of Sedum native to Mexico. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of little, fleshy leaves that are typically green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 9–11 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Sarmentosum

Sedum Sarmentosum Pin

Sedum Sarmentosum, likewise known as “Stringy Stonecrop,” is a species of Sedum belonging to China and Japan. It is a low-growing, rutting succulent that forms long, thin stems with little, fleshy leaves that are typically green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 5–9 and prefers well-draining soil and complete sun to partial shade.

Sedum Cauticola

Sedum Cauticola Pin

Sedum Cauticola, likewise referred to as “Rock Stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum native to Japan. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of small, fleshy leaves that are usually green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 4–9.

Sedum Sieboldii Mediovariegatum

Sedum Sieboldii Mediovariegatum Pin

Sedum Sieboldii Mediovariegatum is a cultivar of Sedum sieboldii that is native to Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of little, fleshy leaves that are green with white or yellow variegation. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are pink or white in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 4–8.

Sedum Rubrotinctum

Sedum Rubrotinctum Pin

Sedum Rubrotinctum, likewise referred to as “Jellybean Plant” or “Pork and Beans,” is a type of Sedum belonging to Mexico. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are generally green in color with red suggestions. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 9–11.

Sedum Rubrotinctum Aureum

Sedum Rubrotinctum Aureum Pin

Sedum Rubrotinctum Aureum, a cultivar of Sedum rubrotinctum also referred to as “Golden Jellybean Plant” or “Golden Pork and Beans,” is a type of Sedum belonging to Mexico. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are normally golden yellow in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 9–11.

Sedum Reptans

Sedum Reptans Pin

Sedum Reptans, likewise referred to as “creeping stonecrop,” is a type of Sedum native to Europe and Asia. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are typically green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are pink or white in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 3–9.

Sedum Rupestre Angelina

Sedum Rupestre Angelina Pin

Sedum Rupestre Angelina is a cultivar of Sedum rupestre, likewise called “Angelina Stonecrop,” which is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of small, fleshy leaves that are generally golden-yellow in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is durable in USDA zones 3–9.

Sedum Rupestre Blue Spruce

Sedum Rupestre Blue Spruce Pin

Sedum Rupestre Blue Spruce, a cultivar of Sedum rupestre likewise known as “Blue Spruce Stonecrop,” is a low-growing succulent that forms a thick mat of small, fleshy leaves that are typically blue-green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 3–9.

Sedum Rupestre Dragon’s Blood

Sedum Rupestre Dragon's Blood Pin

Sedum Rupestre Dragon’s Blood, a cultivar of Sedum rupestre likewise referred to as “Dragon’s Blood Stonecrop,” is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are typically dark red in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is sturdy in USDA zones 3–9.

Sedum Rupestre Lime Zinger

Sedum Rupestre Lime Zinger Pin

Sedum Rupestre Lime Zinger, a cultivar of Sedum rupestre likewise known as “Lime Zinger Stonecrop,” is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are normally lime green in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 3–9.

Sedum Rupestre Matrona

Sedum Rupestre Matrona Pin

Sedum Rupestre Matrona is a cultivar of Sedum rupestre, likewise known as “Matrona Stonecrop,” is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are generally dark purple in color. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summertime to early fall. It is hardy in USDA zones 3-9.

Sedum Fuzzy Wuzzy

Sedum Fuzzy Wuzzy Pin

Sedum Fuzzy Wuzzy is a cultivar of Sedum. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of small, fleshy leaves that are generally green but are covered in great white hair, giving it a fuzzy appearance. It produces small, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is durable in USDA zones 3–9 and prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Palmeri

Sedum Palmeri Pin

Sedum Palmeri is a species of Sedum belonging to Mexico. It is a low-growing succulent that forms a dense mat of little, fleshy leaves that are normally green in color. It produces little, star-shaped flowers that are yellow in late summer to early fall. It is durable in USDA zones 9–11.

Sedum Ground Cover

Sedum is a popular option for ground cover due to its low upkeep and hardiness. It is drought-tolerant and can flourish in poor soil conditions. It is also an excellent alternative for disintegration control on slopes and hills. Lots of varieties of Sedum are offered, with various colors and leaf textures to choose from.

Sedum Roof Garden

Sedum is a perfect option for a roofing system garden due to its capability to tolerate severe climate conditions and its low water requirement. It can likewise help to reduce the heat island effect and provide insulation and soundproofing for the building.

With a wide variety of colors, textures, and sizes, sedum can add a stunning, low-maintenance green cover to any roof.

Sedum Succulent Care

Sedum is a sturdy succulent plant that is easy to take care of. Sedums are best potted in well-drained soil with full sunlight, but they can also tolerate partial shade.

Watering must be very minimal, and it is necessary to permit the soil to dry out entirely prior to watering once again. Sedum can deal with a vast array of temperatures and is dry spell-tolerant.

Sedum Varieties


There are many varieties of Sedum to choose from, each with their own unique characteristics. Some popular ranges consist of Sedum spectabile, Sedum spurium, Sedum acre, Sedum album, Sedum telephium, Sedum kamtschaticum, Sedum reflexum, Sedum rupestre, Sedum sexangulare, and Sedum dasyphyllum.

They come in different colors, leaf textures, and sizes, making them a flexible alternative for any garden.

Sedum For Sale

Sedum is a popular and easy-to-grow plant that is readily available for purchase at numerous nurseries and online sellers. From ground covers to roof gardens, Sedum is a flexible plant that can add appeal and low upkeep to any garden.

With a vast array of varieties readily available, there is a Sedum plant for each garden.

How To Grow And Care For Sedum

How To Grow And Care For Sedum Pin

Sedum, also known as stonecrop, is a durable and low-maintenance plant that is easy to grow. Its thick, succulent leaves and lively flowers make it a popular option for gardens and green roofs. Here is a guide on how to grow and take care of Sedum:

  • Planting: Sedum prefers well-draining soil and complete sun, but can also tolerate partial shade. If planting in a garden bed, dig a hole that is somewhat larger than the root ball of the plant and add a small amount of garden compost or organic matter to the soil. If planting on a green roof, use a light-weight soil mix particularly developed for green roofs.
  • Watering: Sedum is drought tolerant and can go for long periods without water. Water the plants sparingly and permit the soil to dry completely prior to watering once again. Prevent over-watering, as this can lead to root rot.
How To Grow And Care For Sedum Pin
  • Fertilizing: Sedum does not need fertilizer; however, a slow-release fertilizer can be added to the soil at the time of planting to give the plants an increase.
  • Pruning: Sedum does not require routine pruning, but if it ends up being too high or leggy, it can be cut down to encourage bushier growth.
  • Pests and Diseases: Sedum is usually pest- and disease-free; however, it may be impacted by mealybugs or spider mites. If bugs exist, use insecticidal soap or neem oil to manage them.
  • Winter Care: A lot of Sedum species are sturdy and can endure cold temperatures. However, it’s a great concept to protect young plants or those in containers with a layer of mulch or other insulation product to protect them throughout the winter season.

By following these tips, you can enjoy the beauty and hardiness of Sedum in your garden. It’s a great choice for low maintenance and easy-to-grow plants.

How To Propagate Sedum

How To Propagate Sedum Pin

There are numerous methods to propagate Sedum, consisting of division, stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, and seed germination. Here’s a guide on how to propagate Sedum:

  • Division: The easiest way to propagate Sedum is by department. In the spring or fall, thoroughly collect the Sedum plant and divide the roots into smaller sections. Each section must have at least one development bud and a couple of roots. Plant the divisions in well-draining soil and keep them moist until they establish brand-new roots.
  • Stem Cuttings: Another method to propagate Sedum is by taking stem cuttings. In the spring or summer season, take a 4–6-inch stem cutting from a healthy Sedum plant. Dip the bottom half of the cutting in rooting hormone powder after removing the leaves. Place the cutting in a well-draining soil or a mix of sand and peat moss. Keep the soil moist and in an intensely warm place. The cutting needs to root for 4-6 weeks.
How To Propagate Sedum Pin
  • Leaf Cuttings: You can likewise propagate Sedum by taking leaf cuttings. Take a leaf from a healthy Sedum plant and lay it on top of well-draining soil or a mixture of sand and peat moss. Keep the soil moist and in a bright, warm place. The leaf ought to produce new plantlets at the base of the leaf.
  • Seed Germination: Sedum seeds can likewise be sprouted by sowing them on the surface of well-draining soil or a mixture of sand and peat moss. Keep the soil moist and in an intensely warm area. The seeds need to sprout in about 2–4 weeks.

It is important to note that not all Sedum species can be propagated by all the methods mentioned. The best method to use would depend on the species you have and the time of the year. Additionally, when taking the cuttings, it’s best to use a sharp, clean pair of scissors and work on a clean surface.

Top 5 FAQ And Answers For Sedum Succulents

Top 5 FAQ And Answers For Sedum Succulents Pin

Q: How much light does a Sedum succulent need?

A: Sedum succulents prefer bright, direct sunlight but can tolerate some shade. They ought to be placed in a location that receives a minimum of 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.

Q: How often should I water my Sedum succulent?

A: Sedum succulents have low water requirements and should be watered infrequently, allowing the soil to dry out entirely between waterings. Overwatering can result in root rot, so it’s best to wait until the soil is dry before watering again.

Q: How can I propagate my Sedum succulent?

A: Sedum succulents can be propagated quickly through stem cuttings or leaf cuttings. Merely take a stem or leaf cutting from an existing plant, let it calluses over for a day or more, and then position it in well-drained soil. Keep the cutting in a warm, bright place, and it should root in a few weeks.

Q: What pests and diseases should I watch out for when growing Sedum succulents?

A: Sedum succulents are normally resistant to pests and diseases; however, look out for mealybugs, spider termites, and scale bugs. Root rot can occur if there is too much watering. Keep an eye out for indications of these issues and take action rapidly if you see any.

Q: How can I encourage my Sedum to bloom?

A: Sedum succulents generally bloom in the late summer or fall. To motivate blooming, make sure the plant is getting enough sunlight and that it is not overcrowded. To encourage reblooming, remove spent flowers. Also, fertilize in spring with a well-balanced, slow-release fertilizer. With the right conditions, Sedum succulents will reward you with an abundance of starry flowers.

Top 10 Interesting Facts About Sedum Succulents

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  1. Sedum succulents are likewise referred to as “stonecrops” due to their ability to grow in rocky or poor soil conditions.
  2. Sedums come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and colors, making them a popular option for succulent gardens.
  3. Sedums are Northern Hemisphere natives that have been discovered in places such as Europe, Asia, the United States, and Canada.
  4. Sedums are drought-tolerant and can make it through long periods without water.
  5. Sedums are great for ground cover and rock gardens. They can be used as a ground cover and also as a cover in green roofing systems.
  6. Sedums are exceptional choices for xeriscaping or low-water landscaping.
  7. Sedums can be propagated easily through stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or by dividing the plant’s root ball.
  8. Sedums are easy to care for and are perfect for those who are new to gardening or have hectic schedules.
  9. Sedums are likewise known for their stunning flowers, which come in a wide range of colors consisting of pink, red, yellow, and white.
  10. Sedums are likewise used as a food source for animals, such as the caterpillars of some butterfly species, and also as a medical plant.
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