6 Types of Alluaudia Pictorial Guide

Alluaudia belongs to the family Didiereaceae, a genus of flowering plants with six species endemic to Madagascar. The majority of the action takes place in the southwestern subdry forest and thick plant life of the island. 6 Types of Alluaudia Pictorial Guide.
6 Types of Alluaudia Pictorial Guide Pin

Alluaudia belongs to the family Didiereaceae, a genus of flowering plants with six species endemic to Madagascar. The majority of the action takes place in the southwestern subdry forest and thick plant life of the island.

It is a succulent and seasonal type characterized by erect stems with thorns set up around the leaves, which serve as a defense against herbivores. This species of Allaudia is easy to cultivate.

6 Types of Alluaudia Pictorial Guide Pin

Alluaudia’s types are dioecious, with male and female flowers on separate plants. Spines grow around the edges of these leaves as a defense against herbivores. The spinal columns are several meters in the air and were most likely adapted to herbivory by now-extinct lemurs like Hadropithecus.

Many lemur species uch as the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) and the white-footed sportive lemur (Lepilemur leucopus) consume heavily on Alluaudia.

Alluaudias need complete sun or high interior lighting, a well-drained soil mix, and easily flowing air. The very best way to water these succulents is to thoroughly soak the soil and let it dry completely before you water it again. If fertilizer is used, it needs to be watered down to 1/4 the recommended rate on the label.

In this Alluaudia Pictorial Guide, we will cover the following 6 types.

1. Alluaudia Ascendens (Fantsiolotse)

Alluaudia Ascendens (Fantsiolotse) Pin

Fantsiolotse is another name for Alluaudia Ascendens.As the plant matures, expect it to reach up to 15 m (40 ft) high. The plants’ highlights are the lovely green stems that grow upward. When the plant produces flowers, expect them to be white in clusters.

Alluaudia ascendens is a type of Alluaudia endemic to Madagascar. It can reach 15 meters in height. It is pollinated by bats. Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verrauxii), a native lemur, consumes its flowers.

Alluaudia Ascendens (Fantsiolotse) Pin

They are deciduous succulent plants, with a trunk covered with thorns and little fleshy leaves perfectly lined up vertically. When the plant loses its leaves, it is the stem that performs photosynthesis. They produce male and female flowers at the ends of the stems, although they have no decorative interest. They bloom in the autumn. 

2. Alluaudia Montagnacii 

Alluaudia Montagnacii Pin

Alluaudia Montagnacii is a rare type of flowering plant belonging to the Didiereaceae.

Alluaudia montagnacii can reach a height of 6 meters. Strong, vertical branches are grown from this tall, columnar central trunk. The leaves on the stem and branches are symmetrically arranged, and the thorns are black-tipped. During the long dry season, the leaves are deciduous. Photosynthesis is continued by the stems. This plant is well adapted to live in a low-water environment. The flowers are small and green or yellow.

Alluaudia Montagnacii Pin

Alluaudia Montagnacii grows in a narrow band of dry and subarid coastal habitats. Together with Euphorbia intisy and Euphorbia stenoclada, Alluaudia Montagnacii is part of the Madagascar spiny forests.

Alluaudia Montagnacii Pin

Alluaudia Montagnacii is best understood as a weird-looking succulent. As the plant grows, expect it to reach up to 6 m (20 ft) high. The strange green bumps that grow along the stem are the plant’s most distinguishing feature. Expect small green to yellow flowers when the plant blooms. 

Alluaudia Montagnacii Pin

3. Alluaudia Procera (Madagascar Ocotillo)

Alluaudia Procera (Madagascar Ocotillo) Pin

Alluaudia Procera, or Madagascar ocotillo (other names: African ocotillo, False ocotillo), is a deciduous succulent plant type of the family Didiereaceae. It is a rare desert plant that is only found in southern Madagascar.

Alluaudias grows a tangle of stems that last for several years, after which a strong central stem matures itself. The basal stems then die out, leaving a tree-like stem that branches higher up on the primary trunk.

Alluaudia Procera (Madagascar Ocotillo) Pin

Like other members of the family Didiereaceae, the leaves of Alluaudia, produced from brachyblasts similar to the areoles discovered in cacti, are small, appear single, and are accompanied by cone-shaped spines. Alluaudia flowers are symmetric and unisexual.

Alluaudia Procera matures to 60 feet (18 m) tall. Some stems occasionally fork off in a dangling direction prior to curving back upwards. Young plants form a tangle of stems that last for several years, after which a strong central stem matures itself.

Alluaudia Procera (Madagascar Ocotillo) Pin

Alluaudia procera is a deciduous succulent plant that is grown for its foliage. When it develops, it is a vertical tower of stems with oval to round leaves that are around 2 inches in length. The stems are spiny and scarcely branched or occasionally columnar.

The flowers are a series of colors from greenish-yellow to white, orange, gold, and pale yellow and bloom in late spring through midsummer. Since it is dioecious, the flowers will be produced in mature specimens on different male and female plants.

Alluaudia Procera (Madagascar Ocotillo) Pin

Madagascar Ocotillo is one of the easiest plants to maintain.In cultivation, this type can, however, hardly ever blossom, with tiny male or female greenish-yellow flowers that appear in open thyrses at the tips of the branches.

Alluaudia Procera can grow in containers as a houseplant and needs a bright area, but can stay in a pot for a prolonged period of time.

4. Alluaudia Comosa

Alluaudia Comosa Pin

Alluaudia Comosa is an unusual species of flowering plant. It belongs to the Didiereaceae family, subfamily Didiereoideae, and is only found on the coast of SW Madagascar.Common names include: “Hairy Alluaudia,” “Sonoratsy,” and “Somondratsaky.”

Alluaudia Comosa has a distinct, easily recognized silhouette with a brief trunk and thick branches that drop into a flat crown. This is a deciduous shrub to small tree, 2–10 meters high, that is woody, semi-succulent, and spiny, with spines set singly. Spines are gray and 1.5–3.5 cm long.

Alluaudia Comosa Pin

Leaves are developed mostly in sets, set on a short stalk (petiole), and die off at the beginning of the dry season. These leaves are rounded and fleshy; their dimensions are 10–22 mm x 10 mm.

Alluaudia Comosa’s flowers are produced on a lowered inflorescence, and just the end flower develops and is set on a very brief axis. The white flowers are dioecious, with both male and female flowers growing on separate plants.

Alluaudia Comosa Pin

Alluaudia Comosa chooses limestone and grows on the “plateau calcaire” of the south-west. This species is an indication of calcareous soils. Spiny succulents include Alluaudia comosa, which has water-holding stems.The thin, rising stems are iconic.

Alluaudia Comosa is a deciduous perennial plant used as a decorative plant and a drought-tolerant plant that can grow in a desert, Mediterranean, or subtropical climate and is hardy in Zones 9–12a.

Alluaudia Comosa Pin

5. Alluaudia Dumosa

Alluaudia Dumosa Pin

Alluaudia Dumosa is a slow-growing, succulent tree or large shrub native to the semi-arid scrubland and thorn forests of southern Madagascar. Mature plants can reach up to 25′ tall and 15′ broad in the wild, but may reach 10′ high and 4′ wide while growing.

It has gray-green, thick stems with no apparent leaves and extremely few spinal columns. It is simple to grow and tolerates dry spells. 

Alluaudia Dumosa Pin

The mostly leafless, cylindrical, lengthened, grey-green stems are upright to arching and covered in small spinal columns. Seasonally, small clusters of creamy white flowers bloom from the branches. These plants are dioecious; both male and female flowers grow separately.

The specific epithet dumosa indicates “shrubby,” in reference to the growth routine of this type. A specimen can be grown in a pot as a houseplant, mainly for xeriscaping, desert gardens, or rock gardens.

Alluaudia Dumosa Pin

Alluaudia Dumosa requires full sun to partial shade with an extremely well-drained soil mix. In the greenhouse, we use a soil mix of equivalent parts loam and sand, with a little gravel added to ensure good drainage.

Alluaudia Dumosa Pin

The plants are watered and permitted to dry completely prior to watering again. We fertilize them only when necessary throughout the growing season with a well-balanced fertilizer. Throughout the winter season, we move the plants to the cold room, and the nighttime temperature levels are dropped to 48 °F (9 °C). During this period, the plant is only watered enough to keep the roots from shriveling.

Propagation: In spring, Alluaudia Dumosa is propagated from cuttings.

6. Alluaudia Humbertii

Alluaudia Humbertii Pin

Alluaudia Humbertii is a tropical perennial plant endemic to Madagascar. It can presume the type either of a shrub or of a tree with an optimum height of 5-7 meters. It is distinguishable from the more typical Alluaudia procera for its smaller stems. The stems of Alluaudia procera are unquestionably larger than those of Alluaudia Humbertii.

Alluaudia Humbertii Pin

The plant has an actually brief trunk, so branching actually starts close to the ground, so the branches that form are actually long and tend to arch in a really beautiful manner, at least in young individuals. Branches of mature plants are stretched, making the plant taller.

Leaves are small, lined on the branches, fleshy, obovate, and intensely green. They are arranged in sets, and at the axil of each set of leaves there is a set of spinal columns. Flowers are small (their optimum diameter is 1 centimeter), and they flower in our northern hemisphere from August to October.

Alluaudia Humbertii Pin

Alluaudia Humbertii’s natural habitat is seriously dry. You’ll need a cactus-friendly, sandy mix that’s well-drained to grow this plant. Water it rarely; however, keep in mind that this rare watering needs to be abundant because the plant is extremely capable of storing water in its tissues.

Propagation can occur through cuttings, usually taken in the fall or spring, or by seeds.

Alluaudia Humbertii Pin

There were no major insect or disease problems of note. Water-logged or inadequately drained pipes and soil will lead to root or stem rot.

Alluaudia Humbertii makes a fantastic accent plant for xeriscaping, desert gardens, or rock gardens. can be grown as a houseplant.

How to Grow and Care for Alluaudia Succulent Plant:

How to Grow and Care for Alluaudia Succulent Plant Pin

The Allaudia genus includes all six species, all originating from Madagascar. The best crops are grown in sandy loams that are evenly moist to dry, in full sun to partial shade.water when the soil is dry during the growing season.

It requires full sun exposure.

Temperature level: keep it at moderate temperature levels and never below 10 °C.

How to Grow and Care for Alluaudia Succulent Plant Pin

Water: Water moderately just when the soil is totally dry.

Soil: A well-draining pipe’s soil should be a good mix of peat and sand so that the water does not stagnate.

Fertilization: You do not need regular fertilization; it is sufficient to dilute the fertilizer with watering.

Proliferation: by woody cuttings of the stem or by seeds sown in the late winter season.

Resistant: Fire and deer resistance is provided.

Pests and Diseases: There are no major pests or diseases; however, the tree is susceptible to root rot if drainage is inadequate.

Threat: This plant has spines or sharp edges; use severe caution when managing it.

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